Where We Work

Niger

Context

GCERF delineates the Sahel within the context of the Group of Five Countries for the Sahel, also known as G5 Sahel, the intergovernmental body to promote regional cooperation in development and security matters. Our focus is on the central Sahel region covering Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger. Our engagement in the region will directly bolster the implementation of National Action Plans of the three countries working in partnership with local, national, regional, and global partners. Our work began in Mali in 2016 followed by Burkina Faso and Niger in 2021.

The Sahel is one of the most deprived regions in the world. It is home to several fragile and conflict-affected states, each ranking low on the UN Human Development Index and beset by multidimensional conflicts. These conflicts have created fertile environments for violent extremism and organised crime in an already fragile regional context. The region is also a source of criminal activities, including human trafficking and the smuggling of people, drugs, and weapons.

Niger is currently ranked 8 on the Global Terrorism Index of 2022. According to the 2022 Global Terrorism Index, Islamic State accounted for 35 per cent of the total global deaths due to terrorism in the Sahel region, in 2021.

The main drivers of violent extremism are youth unemployment, farmer/herder conflicts and governance-related grievances. VE groups exploit these tensions and insecurities by communicating narratives of injustice and by providing protection in exchange for loyalty.

 

Strategy

GCERF’s Regional Strategy for Investment in the Sahel focuses on Central Sahel, starting with the Liptako-Gourma region. With its community-based approach to P/CVE, GCERF’s Sahel investment strategy will directly contribute to the implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) of the three countries (Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger) in partnership with local, national, and regional partners.

The strategy has two specific objectives:

i) contribute to improvements in the social ecology to create conditions conducive to prevention and resilience-building;

ii) facilitate community-led rehabilitation, disengagement and (re)integration, including of people disengaging from criminal, non-state armed and violent extremist groups.

Pathways to Change

The programme in Niger aims to:

  1. Reduce the risk of radicalization of communities in Niger by helping women and youth in particular to improve their understanding of radicalization, and develop key factors of resilience on individual and community levels.
  2. Create socio-economic opportunities for youth and women.
  3. Create dialogue spaces within communities, and between communities and local authorities and defense forces.

These will be achieved through activities including:

  1. Vocational training for youth and women on innovative vocations, entrepreneurship, financial management, and accountability.
  2. Creation of a business mentoring and technical support system for youth and women.
  3. Development of networking structures bringing together youth and women with professionals and potential business partners.
  4. Creation or revival of community dialogue spaces.
  5. Coaching youth and women to engage with local decision-making structures and processes.
  6. Organisation of dialogue spaces between defense forces, youth, and women.
  7. Trainings on prevention of violent extremism.
  8. Participatory theatre sessions reinforcing social cohesion and raising awareness on key themes.
  9. Radio programming on preventing violent extremism.
Local Partners in Niger <br>

Local Partners in Niger

PARTNER IN OUR WORK

Invest in the
Future of Niger

Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals

Peace, Justice & Strong Institution

Peace, Justice & Strong Institution

No Poverty

Quality Education

Quality Education

Gender Equality

Gender Equality

Decent Work & Economic Growth

Decent Work & Economic Growth

Reduced Inequalities

Reduced Inequalities

Partnership for The Goals

Partnership for The Goals

These goals are based on those set forward in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nation Member States in 2015