Where We Work

Nigeria

Context

Nigeria is ranked 3 on the 2019 Global Terrorism Index. The situation had deteriorated significantly with a dramatic increase in violence in the year earlier. GCERF began investing in Nigeria in mid-2016 and funds local organisations in the North Central Nigerian states of Benue, Kogi, Nasarawa, and Plateau.

The history of hostility in the region is a key structural driver of recruitment and radicalisation to violent extremism. Conflict between farmers and herders–fuelled by a cycle of cattle rustling, reprisals and confrontations–has exacerbated religious divisions and encouraged the propagation of violent extremist narratives. Two of the key drivers of violent extremism identified in the project locations are the perception of a lack of opportunities and material enticements from violent extremist groups. Communities are also concerned about the misinterpretation of religion.

Country Statistics

Country Statistics

STORIES FROM THE GROUND

Young men and women driving change in Kogi, Nigeria

In 2019, the young men and women of Kogi State, Nigeria made history. Supported by GCERF and ActionAid Nigeria, a coalition of young people advocated to establish a Youth Development Commission to ensure their voices are represented in policies governing them.

This is the first time a local community has used GCERF funding to influence the law. The milestone enshrines in law a body mandated to increase socio-economic opportunities for youth and tackle head-on some of the key drivers of violent extremism.

The Kogi Youth Development Commission Bill was signed into law by the Governor of Kogi State on 24 April, 2019. “Today, we made history,” said the Bill’s sponsor, Hon. Ahmed Mohammed. The Bill established a multi-stakeholder Youth Development Commission, whose mandate is to increase social-economic opportunities for youth, reduce antisocial behavior, and empower young men and young women.

Pathways to Change

GCERF funds initiatives to prevent violent extremism in communities to foster peaceful coexistence and social cohesion. This is done by supporting peacebuilding initiatives, conflict resolution systems and platforms for inter-communal dialogue. The core constituencies in Nigeria are youth, women, local religious leaders, traditional leaders and authorities.

Among the range of activities that GCERF funds in Nigeria, GCERF supports grantees to:

  • Raise awareness on the dangers of violent extremism.
  • Build a sense of purpose for community members.
  • Share positive alternative narratives to violent extremism.
  • Train youths on business development and entrepreneurship.
  • Organise policy dialogues on preventing violent extremism.
  • Build capacity of security agencies and voluntary organisations.
  • Host women’s conferences and cultural events for peace.
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112,000 community members participated in activities designed to enhance social cohesion. Indeed, 69 percent of people in focus communities in Plateau State found that, after the GCERF-funded programme, communities enjoyed increased harmony, despite ethnic, religious and cultural differences.

5,600 youth attended sensitisation rallies in high schools

5,220 youth attended the Youth Summit on PVE in Kogi State

287 herder and farmer leaders joined together in 191 dialogue sessions to discuss initiatives for peaceful coexistence

280 youth became members of peace clubs in schools

1,004 community leaders participated in two-day workshops on PVE

2,341 youth from different religious communities were brought together through social cohesion activities (e.g. football matches, music events)

2,007 religious leaders attended interfaith knowledge-sharing sessions to discuss peace, coexistence, and PVE

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21,000 community members participated in activities including:

400 women were trained on peacebuilding and conflict prevention, and then visited schools to engage with more than 2,500 youth to advocate for these issues

600 youth engaged in self-organised peacebuilding activities after participating in GCERF-funded programmes

6,340 community stakeholders (including civil society leaders, community-based organisations, and NGOs) participated in advocacy meetings and community consultations

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4,800 vulnerable individuals participated in activities designed to increase their access to social and economic opportunities.

3,000 youth gained technical vocational skills, and 1,700 women were trained and supported

100 percent of the 268 young men and young women who received vocational training and support successfully gained employment after the GCERF-funded programme

1,062 young men and young women participated in the Basic Business Training Workshop and received a start-up grant after three months

549 women were successfully linked with financial institutions to access credit

110 individuals who were victims of farmer-herder violence – a conflict that has been exploited by violent extremist groups – received support to rebuild their livelihoods

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5,080 participants participated in activities including:

1,271 youth participated in a three-month programme on providing peer support and conflict mitigation, guided by a unique bespoke curriculum

517 students participated in creative clubs established in 8 secondary schools

1,709 youth participated in youth peace camps focusing on changing youth perceptions of violence; 50 percent of participating youth went on to serve as volunteer peace agents in their communities

Community Agency

21,000 community members participated in activities including:

  • 400 women were trained on peacebuilding and conflict prevention, and then visited schools to engage with more than 2,500 youth to advocate for these issues
  • 600 youth engaged in self-organised peacebuilding activities after participating in GCERF-funded programmes
  • 6,340 community stakeholders (including civil society leaders, community-based organisations, and NGOs) participated in advocacy meetings and community consultations

Equal Access to Opportunities

4,800 vulnerable individuals participated in activities designed to increase their access to social and economic opportunities.

3,000 youth gained technical vocational skills, and 1,700 women were trained and supported

100 percent of the 268 young men and young women who received vocational training and support successfully gained employment after the GCERF-funded programme

1,062 young men and young women participated in the Basic Business Training Workshop and received a start-up grant after three months

549 women were successfully linked with financial institutions to access credit

110 individuals who were victims of farmer-herder violence – a conflict that has been exploited by violent extremist groups – received support to rebuild their livelihoods

Sense of Purpose

5,080 participants participated in activities including:

  • 1,271 youth participated in a three-month programme on providing peer support and conflict mitigation, guided by a unique bespoke curriculum
  • 517 students participated in creative clubs established in 8 secondary schools
  • 1,709 youth participated in youth peace camps focusing on changing youth perceptions of violence; 50 percent of participating youth went on to serve as volunteer peace agents in their communities

Local Partners in Nigeria <br>

Local Partners in Nigeria

PARTNER IN OUR WORK

Invest in the
Future of Nigeria

Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals

Peace, Justice & Strong Institution

Peace, Justice & Strong Institution

No Poverty

Quality Education

Quality Education

Gender Equality

Gender Equality

Decent Work & Economic Growth

Decent Work & Economic Growth

Reduced Inequalities

Reduced Inequalities

Partnership for The Goals

Partnership for The Goals

These goals are based on those set forward in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nation Member States in 2015